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Posts Tagged ‘Pilot Metropolitan’

Posted by Dirck on 27 July, 2017

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  • 22 manuscript pages.

That’s a rather better week of it.  The summit is at last in view, too– I’m only about 90 pages from my goal.  This is good news, because what little I know about pacing is shouting at me that delaying the climax much based on where the story stands now is not wise.

I also want to be slightly self-congratulatory about this weeks perseverance, as yesterday saw an honest parade of painful stupidity at Regular Job.  I was able to grunt through it for the noon writing session, but at the cost of forgetting completely to reply to some emails from people seeking work on their pens.  I’d best get at that, eh?

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Posted by Dirck on 20 July, 2017

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  • 15 manuscript pages.

Yes, that is a crappy output. Not only did I not manage to get the binder open once during the vacation, I returned to find a more than usually tall pile of Regular Job awaiting my return (more than is usual for post-vacation, that is), and I forgot about a first-aid re-certification course that ate the whole of this week’s Wednesday.

On the up side, the course reminded me of all sorts of quotidian, mundane horrors to leaven my writing with.  Brr.

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The Desert Island, Part 3

Posted by Dirck on 31 December, 2015

Here we all are, once again staring Futurity in the elusive face, with many of us preparing for parties the purpose of which seems to be to blot out all memory of the past.  What better time to consider the Modern Pens of Desert Island than a day that prepares for a shift in what the word “modern” itself means?

As with yesterday’s list, I am working up in order of increasing attachment.  I also want to give an honourable mention to a pen that very nearly got into the list, and was for a long while getting ready to shove off pens which cost at least six times as much– the Pilot Metropolitan.  I could just as easily make this list one of six rather than five and give it proper recognition, because it really does punch above its weight… but I value symmetry, and if there’s five yesterday, then it’s five official entries today.

Also good for close combat, if cannibals come ashore

I have a slight qualm about the Parker 50 coming to the island, stemming from the reputation of the clip for flimsiness.  Other than that, though, it’s really a splendid pen and one well adapted to life under palm-fronds with it’s stainless-steel everything (except the clip).  It’s possible that if I had a chance to try out a Pilot MYU, I’d swap out this one for it, but perhaps not.  I definitely like the Falcon over Pilot’s even-more-similar Murex.

“Doesn’t that clip bother your fingers?” No.

Next, a pen which surprised me by bubbling along to the top of this list, because I never find myself casting lingering thoughts in its direction (see yesterday’s runner up for that sort of thing).  The VP is a darned good pen, for all I worry about crumbs going in its opening when I carry it around.  Not exciting, but smooth and reliable.  The fact that there’s no cap to drop into the sand on my island and lose forever doesn’t hurt, either; I’m not a constant booster of convenience, but I won’t actively work against it.

…hm? Sorry, didn’t mean to stare.

Can I truly be stranded on this island if I have a Carène?  Perhaps not, if I knew the French words for sail, mast, and compass….  In any event, this is a pen that I was actively trying to convince myself to sell during the really rough financial patch over the summer, because by itself it is actually worth some money and there is evidence on the auction site I decline to name today that people are willing to spend to get a second-hand model.  I couldn’t quite get that battle won– I don’t spend quite as much time in idle contemplation of its beauty as I do with the Parker 75, but I will gaze upon it for the simple satisfaction.  It might have run a little higher on this list if it weren’t quite so given to nib-creep.

Typical. Try to set up a new society, and someone has to insist on being called “Souverän”.

Do I cheat if I bring a pen which I can swap points on?  Possibly.  I can settle on just one if so, and I’d still bring this M600– I do not dream of an M800 or M1000, for I like my pens on the light side and the previous two items in this list carry enough heft for all the others.  This pen is carrying the flag for a lot of other Pelikans, too, because just about all that I own or have worked on made it through to the penultimate cut; I discover I really like this brand.

Who else can claim five decades of looking totally cool?

Another German pen tops to Moderns list, and apparently I and the invisible-handed Marketplace agree on this as a good choice of pen; the Lamy 2000 has, after all, been in production since 1966 with only marginal changes.  Good weight, good size, good writing, good capacity, easy basic maintenance, and as sturdy a pen as I know of– it’s not, depending on your personal preferences, a raving beauty, but it has the sort of rugged handsomeness that a few scars won’t injure.

That’s it for the desert island list.  I hope you all have a fine New Year’s Eve, if it hasn’t already swept over your time zone.  We’ll see you in the next calendar with more nonsense.

Today’s pen: OMAS Arte Italiana (because I’m partying like it’s 1959!)
Today’s ink: Herbin Lie de Thé (because it will enforce a little bit of consideration of the past in this reckless amble into the World of Tomorrow)

 

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The Missing Link

Posted by Dirck on 4 October, 2013

Today’s film is by some measures almost new, but is also quite old.  It’s a “lost” film, and is notable mainly for including Mary Pickford.  I’m not a huge fan of hers (she’s no Brigitte Helm), but she’s a notable figure of her time as much for off- as on-screen activity, and it’s nice to see the old Hollywood back-catalogue enhanced even by family melodrama.

1st Misunderstanding Clip from Keene State College on Vimeo (edit:  Well, I guess WordPress doesn’t embed Vimeo)

Also, if I say, “This is worth a read” I’m using the phrase very efficiently, as it encompasses many levels.

Today’s pen: Pilot Metropolitan (thus the Helm reference)
Today’s ink: Herbin Bleu Nuit

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Let Me Count the Ways

Posted by Dirck on 23 August, 2013

The usual Friday effort celebrates a return to the usual at home; the stink has been defeated, and everyone is back under one roof, so here’s a film the whole family can enjoy.

Liam Neeson + Count von Count = essentially infinite goodness.  But don’t let your kids make you keep playing it.

Today’s pen: Pilot Metropolitan
Today’s ink: Herbin Bleu Nuit

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Fume Hood

Posted by Dirck on 12 August, 2013

My sister-in-law has just returned from a strangely scheduled vacation to Reno, Nevada.  One of the attractions Reno has for people in this more boreal climate is that it’s warmer than here, but that relative difference is both more pronounced in the part of the year between Christmas and St. Patrick’s day than that between Canada Day and Labour Day, and rather more endurable.  Fleeing “bloody cold” for “quite warm” is usual, while trading “warm” for “bloody hot” is odd.  SIL’s trip was founded on different reasons, though, which I’ll touch on after this apparent change of topic.

Over at the Fountain Pen Network, one of the inmates has treated his fellows to a couple of very interesting revivifications of Waterman Carènes, one repainted ivory, the other not only repainted from blue to red but given a super-custom clipless cap.  While one of the lessons one can take from these projects is that the cost of the Carène is probably not too reflective of finish durability, the more interesting notion is the possibility of refinishing a metal-bodied pen to a high degree of perfection, given care, attention, materials and time.  I’ve got a Waterman Super Master with rather corrupt lacquer that is now getting frequent lookings-at with this notion in mind.

As with any new notion, it brings with its attractions some points of worry.  “Say, that’s a good idea” is but the other side of the coin from “Say, is that a good idea?”  The examples linked to above are rather well done and tasteful, but….

Let us return to SIL’s trip.  She was, for reasons of the heart, invited to attend the great Barrett-Jackson car auction— someone on the technical side of that costly enterprise offered her a chance to get away from her homestead tedium, and away she went.  Wife, I and her parents were watching the thing in hopes of catching a glimpse of SIL, and as a matter of course we saw a number of cars.  Some merely old and interesting, some restored, some hot-rodded to a greater or lesser degree.  One of them, a coupe of the late 1930s, was only slightly amended in general outline– wheel arches rearranged for more modern and broader tires, a marginal reduction of roof-height to balance the reduction in tire height– and so rather pleasing to we in the viewing audience inclined to tradionalism in our consumer design.

Except… it had a flame-job on the front fenders and the trunk lid.  You know the sort of thing— painted-on flames, apparently meant to give the impression that the thing is going fast enough to catch fire, even if sitting parked.  Horrible in the extreme to all but a small minority of tastes.

Except… this one was really well done.  The flames had been applied with an airbrush without masking, so like actual flames and unlike the usual flame-job the edges were undefined.  It had the stamp of an actual artist upon it, and even we who do not appreciate the form could applaud this particular expression of it.

Except… the flames on the trunk lid were arranged in a painfully obvious way to compose a devil’s face.  Eugh!

My nightmares are now beset with pens repainted in green kandy-flake with amateurish flame-jobs inflicted upon them.  The unconscious invents a load of hoodlums committing stylographic vandalism for me to fume over.  Yet again, the foolishness of correlating diverse elements of the world is made clear.

Today’s pen: Pilot Metropolitan
Today’s ink: Herbin Bleu Nuit

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