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Posts Tagged ‘Parker 50’

Posted by Dirck on 15 December, 2016

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  19 manuscript pages, plus 7 pages of “Free Balloons for All Good Children”.

For those who take an interest in such things (I can’t be the only one), I yesterday depleted the last of the Diamine Prussian Blue which I started writing the novel with, so we can say with some authority that 4 ml of ink in a Sheaffer Valiant “fat” TD, with what I’d take to be a smaller medium point, will produce 226 pages of double-spaced writing on ruled 8½X11 loose-leaf paper.  Given the vast amount of fiction I got out of the full 80 ml bottle, that seems about right, and that seems like pretty good value for money.  Writing ink now shifts to the Diamine Oxford.

The miserable output on the novel this week is down to the demands of the Christmas season upon a fellows time, by the way.  I suspect next week will be even sadder.

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Chris (Lee) Kringle

Posted by Dirck on 9 December, 2016

Well, it’s that time of the year, where it’s just about all you can do to not beat co-workers to death with the radio which they apparently can’t hear playing four light-pop Xmas tunes on a ninety minute loop, leavened with a couple of traditional Christmas standards and possibly something by Nickelback.

To help with the not-beating, here’s some tunes that you can use to drown out the day’s seventeenth presentation of “Feliz Navidad”:

I heard an interview with Lee rebroadcast shortly after his death, in which he reminisced about being right at the very decision gate of sticking with acting, or giving into the urging of a famous opera star of the 1950s to join him in bringing more and better music to the world.  The path not taken, eh?

Today’s pen: Parker 50
Today’s ink: Jentle blue-black

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Posted by Dirck on 8 December, 2016

Oh, let me tell you about some fun I had on the weekend. Through my own negligence as a householder, I slipped on some ice.  The main injury was not, as my initial vector would have had it, through taking the edge of a concrete stair to the parietal lobe, but resulted from my quick “thinking” to avoid such a blow; the non-slipping leg suddenly took the weight, slipped sideways on an entirely different but smaller patch of ice until it found traction… at which point everything below the knee stopped moving, while everything above the knee carried on for another three or four centimeters.

This hurt rather a lot.

The silver lining in this was twofold.  I discovered that my son does not panic when a parent collapses in a howling heap, but waits for a break in the screaming to ask if he should go inside and call 911 (not this time).  Also, I was presented with an unusual opportunity to amend the lyrics of a Sesame Street song to run “One of These Knees is Not Like The Other” for the amusement of my family.

The reason I mention all this is that my page output is a bit low this week.  For some reason, I was having trouble focussing on Monday.  Things are rather better now– I may even put aside the cane before the weekend is done!

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  24 manuscript pages, plus 11 pages of “Free Balloons for All Good Children”.†

† This is one of those stories that you either vent off by writing or go nuts from it presenting new and ever more upsetting details on the screen of imagination.  I’m cracked enough already, so I’m dividing my attention until the short story is safely pinned onto paper; lunch for the novel, idle minutes in the last half-hour of the work-day and through the evenings for the this horror.

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Parallel Evolution

Posted by Dirck on 1 December, 2016

If nature can throw things like the flying squirrel, the sugar glider, and Draco volans in our faces, then it seems like we have to give the benefit of the doubt to two pen designers who come up with… remarkably… similar solutions to the same problem.

I have been wrestling lately with a Sheaffer Imperial I which needs new rubbery portions.  Since the pen in question was sent to me mostly dismantled, I thought I’d take the opportunity to do an exploded view of the model, as I’ve done for others.  When I slid the feed out of the shell, I said to myself, “That looks familiar….”  In fact, the feed, and the way in which the point clings to it, are so like the same components of a Lamy 2000 that one might almost think they came from the same factory.  Here, have a look:

lamyimperial

Isn’t that interesting?  Now, before we start pointing fingers and shouting “J’Accuse!” at anyone, remember how this entry started.  What we have here is two companies facing a similar engineering challenge– how to get a small point to stay put in a semi-hooded section in which a traditional friction-fit arrangement of point and feed wasn’t possible?  That both companies came up with a very similar response to the question looks a little funny, but consider how the increasing consideration of fuel economy through aerodynamics made so many cars of the 1990s and even the 2000s look like a well-used bar of soap.  There might have been peeking at the work of the other.  But it wasn’t necessarily so.

Oh, and before the Sheaffer partisans decide that it must be that Lamy was lifting ideas from the darling of Fort Madison, because after all, the Lamy 2000 appeared a full five years after the Imperial I, a word of caution.  I can say with certainty that the insides of the 2000 are not much different from those of the Lamy 99

The 99's point-tabs look even more like those in the Imperial, don't they?

The 99’s point-tabs look even more like those in the Imperial, don’t they?

…and the 99 was a budget version of the Lamy 27, and that pen was out in the world at least five years ahead of the Imperial.  As were the ads bragging about its “Tintomatic” feed system.  Just sayin’.

And on that note, here’s the week’s progress report:

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  25 manuscript pages.

 

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Posted by Dirck on 24 November, 2016

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  26 manuscript pages.

* This combination is going to be around for a while. I’ve got a bottle with so little ink in it only a Snorkel can get at it, but not so little that I’m willing to fling it.  The pen has a very fine point, and there’s probably four or five fills to go, so expect to see it into the new year.

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Posted by Dirck on 17 November, 2016

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  24 manuscript pages; this is, it turns out, sort of hard work.

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New Format!

Posted by Dirck on 10 November, 2016

The exclamation point makes it exciting!

For those who are actually enjoying these progress reports, I have another version of telling the whole world my business over at the writing establishment; a gauge showing how the work to date relates to completeness, which updates every day that I get anything written.  It’s about as silly as what I’m doing here, I admit, but it helps to keep me motivated, and since it’s there, you might as well know about it.

This Week’s Pens Inks How Much Novel Written
  •  27 manuscript pages.

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Posted by Dirck on 3 November, 2016

Day What How Much Duration Pen Ink
  • 31 October
  • 1 November
  • 2 November
  • 3 November
  • Second draft of “Discoveries in the Wake of the Last Crusade.”
  • More second draft.
  • Done, done and done (yes, there are three endings), AND some third draft polishing of “Rearranging Deckchairs.”
  • First draft of Impossible Bodies (eeee!).
  • 626 words typed
  • 715 words
  • A total of 2,777 words on the one, and some minor corrections on the other.
  • Eight manuscript pages.
  • 45 min.
  • 55 min.
  • 45 min.
  • 55 min.

You’ll note the use of italics rather than inverted commas on the title of the new project. The long haul has begun!

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And One for Good Luck

Posted by Dirck on 31 October, 2016

A bonus Hallowe’en treat, and one that is guaranteed not to promote cavities!*

* “Cavities” to be understood as the result of oral bacteria consuming sugars.  Cracks due to clenching, and nightmare-induced grinding are exempt from this guarantee.

Today’s non-thematic pen: Parker 50
Today’s ink of no hidden meaning: Jentle blue-black

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The Desert Island, Part 3

Posted by Dirck on 31 December, 2015

Here we all are, once again staring Futurity in the elusive face, with many of us preparing for parties the purpose of which seems to be to blot out all memory of the past.  What better time to consider the Modern Pens of Desert Island than a day that prepares for a shift in what the word “modern” itself means?

As with yesterday’s list, I am working up in order of increasing attachment.  I also want to give an honourable mention to a pen that very nearly got into the list, and was for a long while getting ready to shove off pens which cost at least six times as much– the Pilot Metropolitan.  I could just as easily make this list one of six rather than five and give it proper recognition, because it really does punch above its weight… but I value symmetry, and if there’s five yesterday, then it’s five official entries today.

Also good for close combat, if cannibals come ashore

I have a slight qualm about the Parker 50 coming to the island, stemming from the reputation of the clip for flimsiness.  Other than that, though, it’s really a splendid pen and one well adapted to life under palm-fronds with it’s stainless-steel everything (except the clip).  It’s possible that if I had a chance to try out a Pilot MYU, I’d swap out this one for it, but perhaps not.  I definitely like the Falcon over Pilot’s even-more-similar Murex.

“Doesn’t that clip bother your fingers?” No.

Next, a pen which surprised me by bubbling along to the top of this list, because I never find myself casting lingering thoughts in its direction (see yesterday’s runner up for that sort of thing).  The VP is a darned good pen, for all I worry about crumbs going in its opening when I carry it around.  Not exciting, but smooth and reliable.  The fact that there’s no cap to drop into the sand on my island and lose forever doesn’t hurt, either; I’m not a constant booster of convenience, but I won’t actively work against it.

…hm? Sorry, didn’t mean to stare.

Can I truly be stranded on this island if I have a Carène?  Perhaps not, if I knew the French words for sail, mast, and compass….  In any event, this is a pen that I was actively trying to convince myself to sell during the really rough financial patch over the summer, because by itself it is actually worth some money and there is evidence on the auction site I decline to name today that people are willing to spend to get a second-hand model.  I couldn’t quite get that battle won– I don’t spend quite as much time in idle contemplation of its beauty as I do with the Parker 75, but I will gaze upon it for the simple satisfaction.  It might have run a little higher on this list if it weren’t quite so given to nib-creep.

Typical. Try to set up a new society, and someone has to insist on being called “Souverän”.

Do I cheat if I bring a pen which I can swap points on?  Possibly.  I can settle on just one if so, and I’d still bring this M600– I do not dream of an M800 or M1000, for I like my pens on the light side and the previous two items in this list carry enough heft for all the others.  This pen is carrying the flag for a lot of other Pelikans, too, because just about all that I own or have worked on made it through to the penultimate cut; I discover I really like this brand.

Who else can claim five decades of looking totally cool?

Another German pen tops to Moderns list, and apparently I and the invisible-handed Marketplace agree on this as a good choice of pen; the Lamy 2000 has, after all, been in production since 1966 with only marginal changes.  Good weight, good size, good writing, good capacity, easy basic maintenance, and as sturdy a pen as I know of– it’s not, depending on your personal preferences, a raving beauty, but it has the sort of rugged handsomeness that a few scars won’t injure.

That’s it for the desert island list.  I hope you all have a fine New Year’s Eve, if it hasn’t already swept over your time zone.  We’ll see you in the next calendar with more nonsense.

Today’s pen: OMAS Arte Italiana (because I’m partying like it’s 1959!)
Today’s ink: Herbin Lie de Thé (because it will enforce a little bit of consideration of the past in this reckless amble into the World of Tomorrow)

 

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