What's up at Ravens March.

Vintage pens-Handmade books-Silly statements

Lessons of the Past

Posted by Dirck on 15 October, 2012

The past few days, that is.  I will start nonchronologically with yesterday’s big discovery; the working of a plunging router in a manner considered to be most safe for eyes and calculated to leave all thumbs attached is, in an 80 minute session, remarkably tiring.  It’s a good thing I didn’t quite finish building that ladder, as I was in no shape for prancing about on a roof when I left off.

Moving on, I find that Irony moves to make me feel like an idiot once again.  It has been just over a fortnight since I declared a cooling towards the tribe of Esterbrook, and then I found this little confection:

If I was to get an “icicle”, I’m glad it was in a colour that made sense for the nickname

…which arrived with, including the one in the chamber, eight spare points, two of which had decent tipping and one of which is a rather early (yet wonderfully intact) example of the 2442 stub point which does indeed rather rise above the common miseries of the Esterbrook points that were putting me off.  I don’t know that I’m turned around in my opinion of Esterbrooks in general, which I think may still be distilled down to “interesting bodies, neat arrangement, crap points,” apart from inserting mostly after the second comma, but with this sort of windfall I would be foolish to not think there was some sort of message from unseen powers and one disregards those at some peril.

An opinion which has been quite rehabilitated is one I recently expressed.  Opinion?  Stance, rather, in that I declared I was off buying pens from the entire nation of France.  Two pens have turned me around on this, although I can’t really say how.  This…

Oddly, one never finds the D&D manual asking one to roll a twenty-sided pen (p20).

…and an older item I’ve not yet gotten a picture of have got me turned around.  The Facette shown above in particular is responsible for my reaction, as it was extremely well-packaged and has none of the damage from either transit nor its previous life that got me so stirred up in the past.  The other, older, and (as with so many Watermans) currently unnameable “New Look” model isn’t quite so blameless, but it’s so interesting and in such generally good shape that I can overcome the not-yet-fully rooted chauvinism I was unenthusiastically cultivating.  There is, however, some question about my turn around, as both pens contain a frustration.  Actually, the “New Look” fails to contain the frustration, as it is meant to mount the then-popular glass cartridge, of which I’ve got none, while the Facette has an example of a cartridge which stands between the “original” C/F cartridge and the modern international pattern.  I shall have to be very careful with it.

Finally, there is this rather good example of some rather odd Italian pens:

It must be a good one, because it has a body impression; many try to conceal their origins.

It is, as the person who sent it to me wrote, a really good example of the broad sweep of Italian pens which are usually accused of being knock-offs of the Parker “51” but which may well be (given the ubiquity of ink windows amongst them) knock-offs of the Aurora 88… which is still not a good practice, but at least it’s being kept within borders.  Apart from it being a rather good example &ct bringing me the strange stylophile’s delight, it is the reason for its appearance that renders it a lesson.  It is, I am told by the accompanying note, sent by way of thanks for the entertainment I’ve brought into the donor’s life through my efforts here.  I am moved, indeed nearly dumbfounded, to receive such regards, and I’m sure the donor will take in the spirit intended the next sentence.

I learn from this, of course, that people will find the strangest things entertaining.

Today’s pen: Baoer 388
Today’s ink: Diamine China Blue

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Lessons of the Past”

  1. Maja said

    How odd. I have a Waterman Facette and it takes Waterman long cartridges…..

    Hope the Esterbrook does its siblings proud. For a sec, I thought you were off buying French pens (ie. pens *made in* France, not those sold by French sellers….the former being the topic of our next pen club meeting–ie. the club comprised of the “mellow coastal folk” in your pen club list :))

    • ravensmarch said

      No, it was the location of the seller rather than the maker I was hooting about. It seems I’m developing a bit of a genius for casting baseless national aspersions these days… but I’ll not embarrass myself with a link to my latest idiocy, and just hope the owner of the comment page is appeared on happens upon this veiled expression of contrition.

      …which wanders a bit as a reply. I hope you and the other mellow coastal folk enjoy your wanderings in the product of France.

      Also; it appears that the Facette was about during the transitional period from the oddity of a cartridge mine uses to the common internationals. Unfortunately, I’ve got no clue what the period of the oddity is; it’s apparently a No.23, but while definitive in one sense it’s no help chronologically.

  2. Andrew said

    The charm of your blog is indeed that – the slightly aslant take on things.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: